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Health and Wellness

Are you at risk?

We all like to think that terrible things happen to ‘other people’, and that we are somehow immune to disease and disaster. Until, that is, we come to face to face with fate when we are least expecting it.

Many of the factors that increase our risk of getting a stroke or heart attack are modifiable which means we have some degree of control over them. For example, we can choose to

eat healthy, and so control the level of cholesterol and sodium in our blood. Even with a busy schedule, we can choose to incorporate some degree of physical activity into our day or week.

So we should also be able to tell when these factors are getting out of control and making us more prone to getting sick. Knowing your risk factors helps you identify when you are approaching the danger zone. But you need to be honest with yourself and own it.

Ask yourself some questions:

  • Are you really getting the exercise you need
  • Are you making the effort to get that exercise into your day?
  • Are your clothes getting a little smaller and the numbers getting a little higher on the scales?
  • Are people shying away from you because you smell like an ashtray all the time?
  • Are your credit card bills climbing higher from all the takeout and restaurant deliveries?
 

If you’re answering yes to these questions, then consider the fact that your risk for CVD is increasing. Now is the time to get things under control.

 

References

Alshaikh et al., (2017). The ticking time bomb in lifestyle-related diseases among women in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries; review of systematic reviews. BMC Public Health 17:536 DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4331-7

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